Excuse us, everyone? Brief announcement before we get started: stop peeing on Friends locations. We thought we were clear on this one. Okay, please be seated. We know it's been a while since we've all seen each other. But we gather here today to celebrate friendship—wait, it says we gather here today to say you all suck at being friends? That can't be right: 

Friends Forgot to Never Forget 9/11

9/11 fire truck

Wikimedia Commons: Scott Cameron

We don't care how sensitive a topic it was. We don't care about “too soon.” If ever there was a time for a very special episode, it was on the show centered in New York City during the most consequential moment in New York City history. We're not asking for “The One Where Phoebe Finds Out She's In A Robert Pattinson Movie” or “The One Where Joey Questions Jet Fuel Melting Steel Beams.” Just the single, smallest modicum of courage from the writers to, if not meet the moment, at least glance in the moment's direction. Perhaps with a signature Tribbiani head nod.

Dear Our Younger Readers: POC Lived In NY In The 90s

Look, we can believe a group of friends being all-white. That's not a crime, and thanks to (gestures wildly at the entirety of American history), not all that uncommon. But David Crane, Marta Kauffman, and Lisa Kudrow self-righteously defending the lack of diversity in the show is hogwash. If you live in a major American city, have a job, are a regular at a coffee shop, are actively dating, and still 90% of the people you interact with are white? Maybe look in the mirror. Kauffman did. 

The Way They Talk To Each Other

All this boils down to a simple fact: the friends on Friends don't really act like friends all that much. They trade pointed barbs as like, a default method of communication. They're manipulative and mean. The thing about moments is they eventually build into your entire life. It's important to consider the cumulative effect of moments, especially the ones that live on forever in memories of your friends. 

 

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