Move over, The Simpsons --  there's a new work of IP that has proven to have unparalleled psychic foresight into the dumpster fire of 2021's first few weeks -- 2008's critically-acclaimed dark comedy, Burn After Reading.

On Monday morning, reports emerged that as a part of the FBI's ongoing investigations into the Capitol attack earlier this month, the intelligence agency was looking into a tip that the Pennsylvania woman suspected of stealing Nancy Pelosi's laptop or hard drive amid the siege had attempted to sell the swiped goods to the Russian government. 

As the FBI seeks Riley June Williams for several charges relating to her alleged participation in this month's deadly riot in Washington D.C., a number of witnesses have reportedly spoken to the agency, including her ex-partner, who disclosed the details of this alleged heist. The plan? Williams would ship Pelosi's device to a friend in Russia, who would then sell the gadget to the nation's Foreign Intelligence Service. Remember, folks, keep your friends close and your exes closer -- especially if you're going to brag about stealing a high-ranking government official's laptop and or/hard drive during an act of domestic terrorism. 

Anyways, as Williams' alleged plan, detailed in an affidavit signed over the weekend, began to garner headlines, several people noticed this premise felt a little familiar, eerily mirroring the Coen Brothers' late aughts installment, Burn After Reading. Now for those of you, who like me, were 12 years old in 2008, just missing the 17 year age cutoff to see the R-rated movie, the film centers around a couple that finds a bygone CD on the floor of their local gym filled with what they believe to be sensitive government intelligence. They then attempt to sell the disc to the Russian embassy, in a plan that gloriously backfires. A thinly-veiled satire, poking fun at Geroge W. Bush's America, Burn After Reading has found new relevance amid Donald Trump's time in the Oval Office, with GQ dubbing the film ' ... the Perfect Coen Brothers Movie for the Trump Era," citing the flick's inconsequentialness and its "star-studded cast" acting like complete "idiots."

Soon after, several fans began flocking to Twitter to discuss the movie's uncanny resemblance to the past few weeks' events, with fans noting its current importance ...

...  how the film could be easily confused for a documentary nowadays ...

... and even calling for a decennial reboot, lest the film enters the public domain -- as it seems to have earlier this month, I guess. 

Now folks, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to binge the Brad Pitt classic alongside all 32 seasons of The Simpsons. After an embarrassing loss last year, I am determined to make my 2021 bingo card a winner. 

For more internet nonsense, follow Carly on Instagram @HuntressThompson_ and on Twitter @TennesAnyone

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