10 Years Later, The World of 'Scott Pilgrim' is Gone

This week marks the 10th anniversary of Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, Edgar Wright's adaptation of the beloved comic in which a scrawny indie rocker must battle his girlfriend's evil exes (but it's not considered assault because the story takes place in a world where raging male insecurity manifests as classic video game tropes). Apart from making Michael Cera seem like a badass who can hold his own against Captain America ...  

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... the movie's most impressive accomplishment is its painstakingly faithful recreation of the comic, filming in many of the same locations that inspired the original artwork.

But even just a decade later, this couldn't be done. Scott Pilgrim's Toronto is effectively gone. Sure, Scott's crappy apartment is still around -- although it's not a real apartment, just a shed that somehow hasn't been converted into an uncomfortable Airbnb for die-hard fans.

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JM McNab
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But other locations have entirely changed. The Goodwill store that Scott and Knives frequent, for example, is now a decidedly less ironically-hip gym.

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Then there's Honest Ed's, the mammoth discount store and Toronto landmark often seen lurking in the film's background:

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It's also the setting for a bonkers action scene in the comic. Today, the entire place has been demolished to make room for a goddamn condo building. 

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JM McNab
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Meanwhile, Wychwood Library, where Scott first meets Ramona, is undergoing a drastic renovation.

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And Second Cup, the Canadian coffee franchise featured in both the movie and comic, not unlike your roommate from 10 years ago, has gotten into the weed business. And while they still have cafes across the country, both the movie and comic locations have closed.

Even the central premise of Scott Pilgrim might not work today. The idea that a jobless bass player like Scott could afford any craphole apartment seems especially unrealistic after the city's rent has skyrocketed over the past decade. And while many of the concert spaces seen in the movie are still around, rising rent prices have decimated Toronto's local music scene, shuttering many of the city's venues. Of course, like people, all cities change. But if we ever do get a sequel, prepare yourselves for a story about Scott battling evil condo fees and Pottery Barn crowds.

You (yes, you) should follow JM on Twitter! And check out the podcast Rewatchability

Top Image: Universal

 

 

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