How 'Solo' Ruins One Of The Best Moments In 'Star Wars'

After its release, Solo got some well-deserved flak for how it spent a decent amount of its runtime unnecessarily explaining how popular elements of the Star Wars series came to be as opposed to, y'know, writing an engaging story. We learned how Han got the surname "Solo." (He wasn't born with it; he's a loner!). We learned what "parsecs" measure. (Distance, not time!) We learned why the Millennium Falcon's onboard computer was such an a*****e to C-3PO that one time. (It houses the mind of an a*****e droid!) We even learned where Han got his trademark blaster from, as if that's a thing anyone outside of Wookieepedia's editorial board cares about.

Continue Reading Below

Advertisement

This clumsy approach to retroactively making the canon "make sense" is still continuing thanks to Jon Kasdan -- one of the writers of Solo -- releasing a cornucopia of factoids and notes about the movie on Twitter.

It's an interesting list to read if you liked Solo, but check out this early entry about how Han escapes from the clutches of the criminal overlord Lady Proxima:

"OF COURSE Han told Leia the story of how he and Qi'ra broke out of the Den of the White Worms [Lady Proxima's headquarters] and that's what gave Leia the idea to pull a real thermal detonator when disguised as the bounty hunter Boushh in Jabba's Palace in ROTJ."

Continue Reading Below

Advertisement

Continue Reading Below

Advertisement

If you don't have the original trilogy memorized, he's referring to the scene in Return Of The Jedi wherein a disguised Leia threatens Jabba the Hutt with a thermal detonator in order to force him into buying Chewbacca (it makes sense in context). It's a great scene, not only because it briefly turns the movie all Reservoir Dogs, but also because it demonstrates how much of a badass Leia is. It's an arc that starts with her saving Han and Luke in A New Hope ("Into the garbage chute, fly boy!"), graduates to her using her latent Force abilities to save Luke again in Empire Strikes Back, and culminates in her walking into the hideout of the universe's biggest crime lord and threatening to blow his ass to kingdom come if he doesn't do what she says.

Continue Reading Below

Advertisement

Continue Reading Below

Advertisement

But oh wait, it turns out she got the idea from her space beau all along, not from the depths of her crazy guerrilla warfare mindset -- an explanation that makes even less sense when you consider that A) there's no way the writers of Solo weren't influenced by this scene (grandfatherparadoxwhat), and B) it's trying to lite-trademark the idea of using bombs to threaten people into doing things. We can't wait for Solo 2, in which a childhood flashback reveals that Han invented the concept of gunfire.

Continue Reading Below

Advertisement

Adam Wears is on Twitter and Facebook, and has a newsletter about depressing history that you should definitely subscribe to.

Support your favorite Cracked writers with a visit to our Contribution Page. Please and thank you.

For more, check out It's Ridiculously Easy To Steal A Tesla, Researchers Find and A Legal Snafu Made This 'Baby Driver' Joke Even Funnier.

Also, we'd love to know more about you and your interesting lives, dear readers. If you spend your days doing cool stuff, drop us a line at iDoCoolStuff at Cracked dot com, and maybe we can share your story with the entire internet.

Follow us on Facebook, you should.

To turn on reply notifications, click here

23 Comments

Load Comments

More Articles

6 Very Stupid Questions With Very Smart Answers

No serious person would ask these questions ... but we got serious answers anyway.

139

5 Underreported Dumb Annoyances Pro Athletes Put Up With

Being at the top of your game can really drag you down.

131

4 Horrible Biases That Are Baked Into Everybody's Brain

Sometimes our big, dumb brains are just flat-out wrong.

170

5 'Bad' Movies That Everybody Manages To Get Wrong

Every critic is wrong from time to time.

159

6 Actors Whose Favorite Roles Aren't What You'd Guess

Your favorite isn't necessarily your best -- sometimes it's your worst.

155