Entertainment relies on certain cultural touchstones to resonate with audiences, and those touchstones are different in America than in other parts of the world. But since the entertainment industry wants to make as much money as possible, they tweak and translate our movies, shows, books, games, etc. to make them work in other countries.

Tassler's remarks provide an excellent opportunity to consider how well the international market could be incorporated into the business model that underpins an American television program. And that we should be cautious about what we desire. The illustration of the movies demonstrates that if broadcasting begins to court foreign audiences aggressively, those shows will look very different.

Occasionally, the company that caters to international consumers necessitates script rewrites. Sometimes in cases, this is required simply to gain access to theaters. China has tried to claim script oversight on movie projects. However, the State Administration of Radio, Cinema, and Television had earlier kept an eye out for a lengthy list of forbidden subject areas and descriptions. The Chinese government blocked the allocation of a lot of famous American television programs, such as "The Good Wife," "The Big Bang Theory", and "NCIS."

They're not just translating the words, either. They have to tweak the plots and the jokes -- sometimes with bizarre and unexpected results. Read below for more info…

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