We're not talking about flight, or metamorphosis, or shooting boiling acid out of butts. Most of us are incapable of those things, sure, but some animals are so fundamentally different than us, their abilities don't seem to make logical sense. We're talking about animals that can hear electricity, smell heat, and scream silently: 

Dolphins can not breath... to death. .CRACKED COM Your autonomic nervous system will force you to breath when you're not actively thinking about it. Dolphins, however, actively choose to take each breath. That means they can also choose not to breath, as in the tragic case of Kathy, the retired Flipper actress who grew depressed and died in her trainer's arms.

Spiders can see your iPhone's invisible lasers. CRACKED.COM When you tap your phone's screen to focus the camera, it's actually emitting a LiDAR beam that's invisible to the human eye. But you can see a spider react if YOU tap them through your screen.

Jumping spiders see four primary colors. CRACKED.COM Primary is in the eye of the beholder: we can pick up red, blue, and yellow, but these bad boys see an entire 4th primary color that we, quite literally, can't even dream of.

Birds have some kind of GPS. CRACKED.COM Some birds have an uncanny ability to navigate the globe, possibly using the Earth's magnetic field. Scientists have put tiny little magnetic helmets on pigeons to study them, but still don't really know how they do it.

Jewel beetles can feel infrared. CRACKED.COM They have receptors in their chests that can detect a forest fire dozens of miles away. While you or I might run in the opposite direction, they get all horned up and fly toward the fire (a charred, desolate wasteland is the perfect place to copulate in peace).

Mantis shrimp can pretty much see God. CRACKED.COM If there is a God, even He can't escape the mantis shrimp's freaky gaze. On top of the spectrum of light we can see, they also pick up ultraviolet, infrared and polarized light.

Platypuses can hear electricity. CRACKED.COM They have a 6th sense, electroreception, that's probably most similar to our sense of hearing. They can sense electric fields generated by muscular contraction.

Elephants yell silently. CRACKED.COM They can communicate infrasonically, below the range of human hearing. A horny elephant could bellow about how horny he is, in an attempt to contact a potential mate up to 10 miles away, and we'd be none the wiser.

Moths can speak bat. CRACKED.co COM Some moths have evolved the ability to detect bats' ultrasonic emissions, thwarting echolocation.

Mosquitoes smell carbon dioxide. CRACKED.COM These little sh*t stains are SO good at finding your head because they can detect carbon dioxide, and ride the wave of breath right back to your mouth hole.

Bees feel electricity in their leg hairs. CRACKED.co Special sensory hairs in their legs compare the bees' own positive charge with flowers' negative charges. They can then tell whether another bee has recently visited a flower, and they should move on to a fresh one.

Vampire bats smell heat. CRACKED.COM They can sniff out the juiciest vein to chomp into using heat sensors located inside their nostrils.

Pit vipers see temperature. CRACKED.COM Pit vipers' eponymous pits are little receptors under their nostrils that detect infrared light. These guys have night vision goggles built into their faces.

Jellyfish can regress to infancy. CRACKED.COM How sweet would it be to just shrink out of society and drop some goo's and ga's in your old crib? Immortal jellyfish do just that: once they've had kids of their own, they shrink and sink back to the form and location of their infancy, and start it all over again.
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