Some of the most iconic props and sets in movie and television history have been recycled from other productions. The Iron Throne from Game of Thrones, for instance, was made from repurposed metal scraps. Other famous examples include the DeLorean from Back to the Future, which was built from leftover parts from other cars, and the T-800 endoskeleton from The Terminator, which was created using surplus military equipment. Even the Millennium Falcon from Star Wars was originally designed for another film before being reused for George Lucas's space epic. While some might see recycling as a way to save money, it can also be seen as a way to add character and richness to a production. After all, there's something special about knowing that the objects on screen have been used in other stories and that they will continue to be used in others long after the credits have rolled.

Hollywood is kinda like a crossover between the ending scene of Raiders of the Lost Ark and a Hoarders episode. Just imagine mountains of crates of boxes containing stuff they discarded but can't get around to putting in the trash can, in case it eventually comes in handy. And guess what -- once in a while, there is something useful in there. The leftovers of past productions often make good raw material for sequels -- like these cases make it clear.

The Lost World: Jurassic Park COMPSOGNATHUS The tiny compies play a big part in Michael Crichton’s novel -- but in the movies, they don’t show up until the sequel. The opening scene where they attack a little girl on a beach is from the novel as well.

Source: Syfy Wire

X-Men: Apocalypse CYCLOPS DISCOVERING HIS POWERS A teen Scott Summers first manifests his powers in a high school bathroom. A similar scene was written for the first movie, but then scrapped (it does show up in a novelization, though).

Source: CBR

Mary Poppins Returns CAN YOU IMAGINE THAT? The song is a throwback to The Beautiful Briny- a different underwater song that was cut from the original Mary Poppins.

Source: Vanity Fair

Arrow THE LAST EPISODE No, not the entire episode, of course - but the opening scene includes footage that was shot for a Season 2 episode, but cut for lack of time.

Source: Screen Rant

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