Some of the complaints we all hurl at Netflix daily make sense, like why are they platforming people who could very well be villains who found a way to escape their '80s schlock films, or why do they cancel all the awesome animation content they put out? Also, why is the "Dun Dun" sound that plays along the Netflix logo sound just like the "Dun Dun" sound from Law & Order? There's one thing we can't complain about, however, and that's the service's sweet game library. Not to worry, however, because we can totally complain about Netflix's promotion of these games, as well as their ease of access, for it is none.

the title screen for Into The Breach, an instant classic of a turn-based strategy game.

Subset Games

“No, Dad, I don't want to play Into The Breach as long as there's Emily In Paris to rewatch!" - the worst kid anyone has ever made up.

It turns out that Netflix has a surprisingly good library of games, one that easily beats its tv show library, but a recent report shows that 99% of its users probably don't even know they're there. To put it into perspective, 1,7 million users play the games on Netflix, but that's somehow crap numbers because we're talking about a service with 221 million subscribers. Now that our readers know that Netflix has games, the next step is to explain how to get to them because Netflix turned that process into a whole-ass game of its own.

Netflix game browser

Netflix

Yeah, whereas one would expect Netflix to just require a more expensive subscription to gain access to games (don't get any ideas, this is already enough of a diss piece), it requires hopeful players to first open the Netflix app, but not on the Netflix app we have on our TVs. After opening the app on a phone, we need to scroll down all the way until we see games. Then we'll pick the game that will then be downloaded as an unrelated app that's identifiable only by the Netflix logo. After booting up the game, players will have to log on to their accounts. Thanks for the tutorial, Kotaku.

It sucks that the games still can't be played on a TV, but people better start playing them on their phones so that Netflix even considers expanding the operation before scrapping the whole thing.

Top Image: Netflix

 

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