The new teaser for Thor: Love and Thunder features the return of Thor's greatest love: Chris Pratt, apparently? But Natalie Portman is also in it as Jane Foster, Thor's romantic interest from his first two movies, who has become the second human in the MCU to pick up Thor's hammer after Captain America -- coincidentally (or not?) after dying her hair blonde like the Chrises Hemsworth and Evans. 

How did Jane Foster become the female Thor? The answer is in the comics … where her depiction wasn't always so badass or dignified. Jane was introduced as a regular nurse who had a crush on Thor and was unaware that she was working alongside his human identity, Dr. Donald Blake. Most of her early appearances revolve around Jane clumsily stumbling into the hands of various villains, being rescued by Thor, and fantasizing about getting to touch his hammer. 

Thor comic book panel showing Jane Foster.

Marvel Comics

Oh, like you haven't. 

Thor liked Jane back from the beginning and spent a long time trying to convince his dad to let him marry her, but Odin forbid him from even dating a mortal because he didn't want mixed race grandkids. This leads us to the first time Jane gained superpowers: the issue in which Odin agrees to turn her into an Asgardian goddess so she could marry Thor, only for Jane to freak out and beg to go back to being human because her "hapless girl" mind was just too weak. 

Thor comic book panel showing Jane Foster.

Marvel Comics

Thor comic book panel showing Jane Foster.

Marvel Comics

Plot twist: she was faking it because she just hated the stupid wardrobe. 

Odin was so disgusted that he even deleted Jane's memory of her whole affair with Thor from her mind. Later, Jane came down with a mortal illness and the only way to save her life was for Thor's other love interest, the goddess Sif, to merge her life force with Jane's. This caused wimpy Jane to become more adventurous and just a teensy bit psychotic, which Thor found "exciting." Sadly for him, she went back to normal after a while. 

Thor comic book panel showing Jane Foster.

Marvel Comics

Thor comic book panel showing Ulik the Troll.

Marvel Comics

"Is Zotarr also a hot woman with a giant knife? Otherwise I don't care." 

There was also that alternate reality story with the "wacky" concept of "What if Jane became a female Thor?" which ... didn't go too well for her in the end (unless you consider marrying an elderly bully a victory). So when Thor became unworthy of his hammer and a mystery woman took over his job, Jane didn't seem like the most likely candidate -- especially since she was dying of cancer at the time and seemed pretty frail. Thor visited her to rule her out, but it mostly seemed like a formality, since she was a supporting character in the comic who happened to be the same gender as the new Thor. 

Thor comic book panel showing Thor.

Marvel Comics

Thor comic book panel showing Jane Foster.

Marvel Comics

“I actually just came to ask if you have Black Widow's number?”

Of course, the new Thor was Jane and to everyone's surprise (including the readers') she turned out to be a pretty great one. Dude Thor (or Odinson) didn't take this well at first but soon got over it and officially ceded his title to Jane, who remained the Marvel Universe's Thor for a few years until the tragic end of her cancer storyline -- which wasn't the end of the character herself, it turned out. But we've spoiled enough for one article so you'll have to Wiki the rest on your own (or, you know, wait for the movie). 

Follow Maxwell Yezpitelok's heroic effort to read and comment on every '90s Superman comic at Superman86to99.tumblr.com. 

Top image: Marvel Studios, Marvel Comics 

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