Fans have many ways of engaging with what they love: going to conventions, posting on dedicated message boards, writing fanfiction, hiding in the bushes outside their favorite authors’ home… Most of the time, it’s a one-way, trickle-down thing; but it happens on occasion that some salmon-like fan manages to swim upstream and lay their eggs in their source material (this metaphor went down a weird road, but we’re sticking to it). 

It's a beautiful thing - fans get to feel like they're being heard and that their ideas matter and creators get some pretty nifty ideas, as well as cover all-important fan service. If only other areas of life functioned like this - we're looking at you, politics. But honestly, that stream might just be too polluted, but we can dare to dream.

Here we have collected several examples of beautiful fan-hatchlings in canon. And they managed to avoid being eaten by bears along the way.

The Expanse thanked fans, in-show.

THE EXPANSE RENAMED A SHIP AS A THANK YOU TO FANS. The Screaming Firehawks, as the fans are called, started a campaign to save The Expanse after Syfy cancelled it, which led to Amazon picking up the show. As a tribute to them, the racing ship Razorback was renamed as The Screaming Firehawk in Season 5.

Source: CBR

A five-year-old child designed an Angry Birds level.

AN ANGRY BIRDS LEVEL WAS DESIGNED BY A FIVE-YEAR-OLD CHILD. A wiggly wall to bounce birds off, a treasure chest, and a box of TNT. -these are some items in the level design that young Ethan submitted in 2010 to Angry Birds publisher Rovio (with his mom's help). Rovio couldn't say no to such an adorable request, and included Ethan's level in an update.

Source: GameZebo

Three teens from Virginia chipped in on Tiny Toons.

THREE TEENS FROM VIRGINIA WROTE A TINY TOONS EPISODE. Eighth-graders Renee Carter, Amy Crosby, and Sarah Reef wrote a story titled Buster and Babs Go Hawaiian, and then sent it to the TV station on a whim. The story eventually made it to Steven Spielberg's desk, who liked it SO much that he bought it and produced it.

Source: Education Week

A fashion-minded fan designed Supergirl's costume in the 70's.

A ASHION-MINDED FAN DESIGNED SUPERGIRL'S 1970S COSTUME. All through the '70s, Supergirl had a very '70s look, complete with plunging neckline, bishop sleeves, choker, and hot pants. The outfit was sent in in 1972 by reader John Sposato, and Supergirl wore it for ten years.

Source: CBR

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