In the old days, from the time the video started spinning until it stopped, a camera shot was generally composed of a series of frames filmed in a continuous sequence.

We had NO idea how they made those gross, glistening eggs in the ‘Aliens’ franchise. We were also surprised to learn when and where CGI pubes were employed. Don't even get us started on the wild stuff they pulled when making Charlie and the Chocolate Factory…we wonder if any of the cast ever got to swim in the chocolate river.

You would have assumed that The Phantom Menace was almost all CGI with the exception of (most) of the actors, but it turns out that they went with a low-tech approach. In some ways, it's astonishingly low-tech. So if you want all of the details on famous cinematic shots with surprising back stories, here are all of the details, as well as 14 additional stories:

The podracing audience in The Phantom Menace was a bunch of painted Q-Tips. F f The whole podracing arena was an elaborate miniature set, and the vehicles were intricate miniatures too.

Source: SlashFilm

Actual petri dishes were used to make the visual effects in The Fountain. The space voyage effects were made by swirling things like curry powder and yeast in a petri dish.

Source: AWN

The cars falling from planes in Furious 7 weren't CGI. Shooting the scene involved two weeks practicing dropping cars out of C-130 airplanes (with parachutes). CRACKED.COM

Source: NPR

Herman Munster's face in The Munsters was actually purple. The actor, Fred Gwynne, wore purple face paint because that paint looked very bright in black-and-white.

Source: MeTV

Samantha Stevens' signature nose-twitch in Bewitched relied on a subtle visual effect. In any shot where you see Samantha twitching her nose, the footage is slightly sped up. CRACKED.COM

Source: Yahoo

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