We Already Got a 'Myst' TV Show, It Was Called 'Lost'

Before internet pornography was easily accessible, people in the '90s had to spend their spare computer time playing point-and-click adventure games, presumably channeling all of their pent-up sexual frustration into ridiculous puzzles. There was no greater example of this than Myst, the beguiling game that transported players to a strange island full of secret passages and magical books. The game was so popular that it spawned sequels, novels, and comic books, and there were even plans to build a puzzle-filled Myst theme park in Disney World. That would have been awesome, but probably would have been ruined by a bunch of animatronic Johnny Depps eventually.

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Though there haven't been any new Myst games in quite a while, it's still somehow in the public consciousness, likely thanks to a version for the iPad and reporter Ronan Farrow, who occasionally takes time away from exposing celebrity sex criminals to share his love of the iconic game.

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Now comes word that Village Roadshow Entertainment has bought the rights to Myst in order to "develop a multi-platform universe including film, scripted and unscripted television content." Meaning that we'll probably get Myst movies, a TV show, and even a reality TV show -- like American Idol, but instead of singing, contestants solve puzzles on a decades-old Apple while an irritable Brit screams at them.

But here's the thing: We already got an epic Myst TV show. It's just that it was called Lost.

We know Lost wasn't literally an adaptation of Myst, but they sure share a lot of similarities. Both the game and the series begin with characters inexplicably awakening on a mysterious island. Aimlessly wandering around reveals that both islands contain hidden hatches ...

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... where you have to input specific numbers ...

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There are also random pirate ships on both islands. And one of Myst's most memorable puzzles involves inputting a specific sequence of notes on an organ, while Lost's Season 3 finale similarly finds Charlie playing the Beach Boys on a keypad to access a computer. Even more specifically, both Myst and Lost feature elaborate mythological backstories about rival color-coded brothers. Myst has Sirrus and Achenar, trapped in red and blue books, respectively. Lost eventually reveals that the island is home to two superpowered bros, Jacob and the Man in Black, who wear white and, well, black.

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Plus, a lot of Lost just feels like a video game, which wasn't an accident. According to co-creator Damon Lindelof, there were "a lot of gamers on the writing staff," and for him personally, "the big game-changer was Myst." And if you thought that the ending of Lost was terrible (which it wasn't), if you don't play Myst well, it can end with you trapped in a book for all eternity. Hopefully that will be a potential consequence on the reality show.

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For more, check out Here's The Contender For The Dumbest Gaming Hot Take Of 2019 and A Group Wants Netflix To Cancel Good Omens, An Amazon Show.

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