5 Simple Solutions That Would Make Facebook Bearable Again

Facebook has been open to the general public for 10 years, which means that all of the bugs and kinks should be worked out by now. But because of the nature of the Internet and just plain ol' dumbass human interaction, the longer Facebook is an entity, the stronger its IQ vacuum becomes. Fortunately, I have some very simple solutions to some very big problems. Maybe one of its 12,000 employees will see this article and use these free ideas to fix horseshit like ...

#5. Seeing Racist Posts From People You Love

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Want to keep in touch with all those family members you see only when someone dies or subpoenas you as a character witness? Obviously Facebook is perfect for that, until you friend them and watch your feed fill up with images of Obama burning the Bible and laughing his MS Paint-drawn horns off. It's usually accompanied by links that promise to show you something "They" don't want you to see. It almost always includes a curse word, followed by "Muslims." Every issue, no matter how minor, is "destroying the country."

Make even the most innocent comment about the subject and your timeline erupts in a flurry of racist idiocy, like a wrestling match between Hulk Hogan and David Duke. In my experience, people rarely talk in such extremes in person, but once they're on a platform where they don't have to see the horror creep into the eyes of whoever they're vomiting this nonsense onto, all bets are off. While you're wondering where all this crazy came from, they're busy stacking their profile with Minions memes to really hammer home their views on immigration.

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"THIS will show them! Let's see you debate THAT!"

Knowing your extended family's personal political stance shouldn't affect how much you love them, but there's only so many shared images about "those lazy welfare queens" you can take before calling an exorcist.

The Solution:

Google has an algorithm that can predict your searches like a fucking Pandora channel. There's no reason Facebook shouldn't be able to create one that blocks all content by keyword. It could even filter out all content for a specific profile that they didn't upload themselves. Meaning every meme gets cock-blocked way before it ever reaches your eye-holes.


We'll call it "The Timeline Un-Fucker."

Now you can keep updated on their actual lives and not whatever shiny new conspiracy theory has caught their attention this week. It's more connection than unfollowing but doesn't require you to "hide all posts by this clearly insane, racist dickhole" every time they find a new one.

This same algorithm could benefit every single personality type out there, even outside of the political subjects. Don't want to see anything related to pumpkin spice? Block it. Minions? Blocked! NRA? Blocked right in the face! Tetris? Oddly enough, unable to be blocked.

#4. Watching Your Family And Friends Fight Each Other

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I posted something about #blacklivesmatter about a month ago. Ten minutes later my phone sailed right through my (closed) window of its own power and volition. You know the reason already. It took about four seconds for friends and family to go from a somewhat human discussion to an all-out flame war. While I was talking to a family member about different ways to look at a problem, a bunch of unrelated people decided, "Hey, I don't know this person, so I'm going to yell my thoughts right into his stupid goddamn suckhole until he feels dumb enough to concede my victory."

Neither side is ever going to see the other person in real life. Chances are, they'll never interact again, even online. They don't give a shit that you're the common denominator. Both sides only see someone they have to enlighten on the ways of the world. With caps lock. I seriously got private messages from one side of the argument later on saying, "Oh, is he still arguing in good faith now?" No, dipshit; he feels attacked, so he's lashing out. I don't care if he's wrong; you wouldn't start screaming your beliefs at a stranger on the sidewalk, so don't do it on my timeline. And fuck you very much for asking if you can "go ahead and unleash now" on a member of my family, person I kind of remember from school.

Creatas Images/Creatas/Getty Images
Nice to meet you! Again ... I think?

The Solution:

This particular problem actually has three solutions, and I wouldn't mind seeing every one of them put into place.

Just because you have these two groups of people in your life, it doesn't mean they have to interact with each other. If they insist on doing that, however, at the very least Facebook can create a special warning that pops up before their message gets posted: "This person is a family member. Please remember that I have to see this person in the real world at some point, whereas you do not. You being a cockhole to them, whether they deserve it or not, makes life difficult for me."

Or for your more vocal friends, a "Rage to Humanspeak" translator could work wonders. It would auto-translate all rage-fueled phrases into a calm, polite, and rational response. Something like "You can't possibly be this fucking stupid" would become "I see the issue from an alternate perspective."

Finally, for the absolute worst-case scenario, the comments would show up as each person getting the final word. Once the "discussion" turned over-the-top, there's no going back with your bile cannons loaded. The last response each person posted would show up as the final response in that thread to the person that posted it. So Uncle Dave and Friend Chet both would walk away thinking they had the final say and the other guy was totally shut down. Winners all around.

#3. Having To Explain Hoaxes To People Who Were Duped By Them

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Social media (and the Internet as a whole) allows news to be shared so fast that even professional outlets aren't checking to see if they're full of shit or not. Some people just read headlines and say, "Yeah, I bet that could happen," without checking, or even caring, to see what butthole that story was pulled from.

Every week there's a new dumbass, image-based meme warning parents about houses giving out drugs disguised as candy for Halloween, saying NASA has "confirmed" 15 days of darkness, or about Satan being spotted shitting from the clouds above an ISIS camp. I made that last one up, but I'm sure someone with decent Photoshop skills can make that happen and get it passed around on Facebook in a matter of minutes.

With one click of a button, you can warn your whole monkeysphere about that horrific, "might be bullshit but better safe than sorry" story. You'd be a bad person if you didn't share it.

The Solution:

Any story purporting to be true can be shared only after the sharer enters a verification code found on the relating Snopes page. Any news story too recent to have a Snopes entry can be posted only by consenting for the post to flash red over and over, prefaced with big bold letters, "THIS POST HAS NOT BEEN VERIFIED AS FACTUALLY ACCURATE AND IS IN ALL LIKELIHOOD A STUPID FUCKING HOAX!" Any attempt to share a well-known hoax will get your account banned for 48 hours and, after three attempts, someone will come to your house and personally punch you in the dick, even if you're sharing it ironically.

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Emily Leighty

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