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6 Musicians Who Predicted Their Own Death in Song

#3.
Hank Williams - "I'll Never Get Out of this World Alive"

Immediately, there's nothing too shocking or particularly insightful about the title of this song. It's obvious that everyone is going to die at some point. Most of those people, however, won't crank out a comical tune about it right before they go. Released in 1952, "I'll Never Get Out Of This World Alive" was the last single Hank Williams released in his lifetime. The lyrics are your standard down-on-your-luck type of stuff. Troublesome, sure, but nothing life threatening going on. But still, there's that chorus...

Unfortunate Lyrics:

"No matter how I struggle and strive. I'll never get out of this world alive."

What Happened Next:

After reportedly struggling and striving, Hank Williams barely made it out of the rest of the year alive. On the morning of January 1st, 1953, just months after the song was released, he was pronounced dead at the Oak Hill Hospital emergency room.


"Doctor, hurry, he's struggling. And striving! Oh no..."

There is a myth that the song was actually #1 on the Billboard charts at the time of his death, but "I'll Never Get Out Of This World Alive" actually didn't reach the top spot until shortly after his death. Today, Hank Williams is hailed as an innovator in the field of record promotion for being the first to employ the "Die Young and Sell a Ton of Records" technique.

#2.
John Lennon - "Borrowed Time"

You may not know this, but most posthumously released songs are indeed recorded before the artist dies. Although "Borrowed Time" wasn't released until four years after the death of John Lennon, it was actually the first song he recorded following a five year exile from the music business. The unnervingly upbeat tune wraps lyrics about the frailty of life around the type of instrumentation you would expect to hear during dinner on a Carnival cruise ship. It was inspired by a Final Destination-like escape from death Lennon pulled off while sailing to Bermuda through an intense storm. An experience like that would probably just inspire us to shit our pants and stop showering. Lennon, on the other hand, was inspired to start rocking again.

Unfortunate Lyrics:

"Living on borrowed time, without a thought for tomorrow"

What Happened Next:

John Lennon was sometimes criticized for not practicing what he preached. Like how he sang about imaging no possessions but lived in a million dollar apartment. You could argue that he totally lived up to the lyrics of "Borrowed Time," but you'd be a fucking prick for doing so. We only mention that criticism because it was Mark David Chapman's main beef with John Lennon.


Speaking of beef, holy shit, right? Mooo, right?

Chapman delicately handled this beef by shooting Lennon to death, about six months after the song was written. Hopefully, Lennon practiced what he preached this time and genuinely didn't have a "thought for tomorrow," because, unless that thought was "be dead," he was guaranteed to be pretty disappointed.

#1.
Jimi Hendrix - "The Ballad of Jimi"

In 1965, before most people even knew who he was, Jimi Hendrix entered a New York recording studio and probably weirded out everybody in the room by cutting a new tune about how some dude named Jimi was going to be dead in five years. "The Ballad of Jimi" starts with a declaration from Hendrix that the song is dedicated to the memory of his best friend. That the friend's name is a guitar player named Jimi is apparently to be chalked up to coincidence.

Hendrix further confuses matters with the line "that is my story" before ratcheting the creepiness up considerably.

Unfortunate Lyrics:

"Many things he would try, For he knew soon he'd die."
"Now Jimi's gone, he's not alone. His memory still lives on."
"Five years, this he said. He's not gone, he's just dead."

What Happened Next:


"I'm gonna go over there and die, now."

Next, Jimi Hendrix suffocated in the most horrible way imaginable that doesn't involve cock. He choked on his own vomit. Conveniently, for the purpose of this article, he died almost exactly five years after recording "The Ballad of Jimi." "Five years, this he said. He's not gone, he's just dead."

Disturbing as all fuck, isn't it? Probably the only reason he didn't get more specific than that was that nothing rhymes with "choked on vomit."



Read more from Adam at ScenicAnemia.com. Hell yeah.

To find out about more creepy happenings in the realm of famous people, check out The Insane True Stories Behind 6 Cursed Movies. Or check out The 5 Historical Figures Who Died The Weirdest Deaths.

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